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Hamstring strain - aftercare

Description

A strain is when a muscle becomes overstretched and tears. This painful injury is also called a "pulled muscle."

If you have strained your hamstring, you have pulled one or more of the muscles on the back of your upper leg (thigh).

Alternative Names

Pulled hamstring muscle; Sprain - hamstring

More About a Hamstring Strain

There are 3 levels of hamstring strains:

Recovery time depends on the grade of the injury. A minor grade 1 injury can heal in a few days, while a grade 3 injury could take much longer to heal or need surgery.

What to Expect

You can expect swelling, tenderness, and pain after a hamstring strain. Walking may be painful.

To help your hamstring muscle heal, you may need:

Symptoms, such as pain and soreness, may last:

If the injury is very close to the buttock or knee or there is a lot of bruising:

Symptom Relief

Follow these steps for the first few days or weeks after your injury:

For pain, you can use ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), or acetaminophen (Tylenol). You can buy these pain medicines at the store.

Getting Active Again

When your pain has decreased enough, you can begin light stretching and light physical activity. Make sure your provider knows.

Slowly increase your physical activity, such as walking. Follow the exercises your provider gave you. As your hamstring heals and gets stronger, you can add more stretches and exercises.

Take care not to push yourself too hard or too fast. A hamstring strain can recur, or your hamstring may tear.

Talk to your provider before returning to work or any physical activity. Returning to normal activity too early can cause re-injury.

Follow-up

Follow up with your provider 1 to 2 weeks after your injury. Based on your injury, your provider may want to see you more than once during the healing process.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

References

Ali K, Leland JM. Hamstring strains and tears in the athlete. Clin Sports Med. 2012;31(2):263-272. PMID: 22341016 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22341016.

Bhatti OM, Weinman BM, Hoch AZ. Hamstring strain. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 68.

Guanche CA. Hamstring injuries. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 88.

Reider B, Davies GJ, Provencher MT. Muscle strains about the hip and thigh. In: Reider B, Davies GJ, Provencher MT, eds. Orthopaedic Rehabilitation of the Athlete. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 24.


Review Date: 5/14/2016
Reviewed By: Jesse Borke, MD, FACEP, FAAEM, Attending Physician at FDR Medical Services/Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital, Buffalo, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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